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           			     Above
				       |	
                                    Manshah
                                       |
	        		    Indraman
	          		       |
	        		    Shahman
		        	       |
		                  Parvat Singh
		        	       |
	        		  Anirudh Singh
	        		       |
	         		   Jeet Singh
	         		       |
	          		  Bhagwat Singh
	            		       |
	           		  Gopal Singh
	           		       |
	          		   Parichhat
	        		       |
	         		Chandrabhan Singh
	          		       |
	         		 Raghuraj Singh
	          		       |
	          		 Ravindra Singh
	          		       |
		            	Raghvendra Singh


  Gopal Singh, the first Jagirdar, was a skillful warlike and experienced Chief and for a short time after the British occupation of Bundelkhand. In 1803 he kept three battalions of infantry and a cavalry regiment employed against him. He defeated Captain Winch's detachment at Piparia, sent the wounded back and when closely pursued made his forces break off to the right and left and rendezvous in the rear of the British and then advanced rapidly to set fire to the British cantontment at Tarahvan. He had been in the command of Durjan Singh and Hari Singh, the grand sons of Chhatrajit Singh of Jaso.

During the invasion of Ali Bahadur, he seized the Kutra pargana for himself. For years he resisted all efforts of persuasion or force to reduce him to submission but being at last convinced of the hoplessness of unequal contest with the British troops he finally submitted on condition of recieving a full pardon and a provision in land. A Sanad was given to him in 1812. As an inducement to Gopal Singh to submit, the Raja of Panna, whom Gopal Singh had befriended in distress, gave him eighteen additional villages. The Raja of Panna attested that these villages were given on service tenure but in 1821 after full enquiry it was decided that no such condition was annexed to the grant.

The villages continued with Gopal Singh till his death in 1831, when they were resumed by the Raja of Panna. The original grant having been adjudged only for the lifetime of Gopal Singh. At the request of Diwan Bahadur Parichhat, his son Randhir Singh was recognized in 1861 as his future successor. The conduct of this Jagirdar during the mutiny of 1857 was not satisfactory though he recieved the Right for Adoption. A relief of one quarter of a years net revenue was taken on all direct successions and of one half of succession by adoption.